Category: PASS Community Summit

PASS Summit 2014 Pre-Con Preview: Grant Fritchey

Sept. 15, 2014 – Go inside PASS Summit 2014's full-day pre-conference sessions in this Q&A series with our presenters. In this interview, Grant Fritchey gives us a sneak peak at what to expect from his pre-con, Query Performance Tuning in SQL Server 2014.

Q: If your pre-con had a theme song, what would it be and why?
A:
 "More Human Than Human" by Rob Zombie. I picked this song because I think a lot of people are going to walk out of the session feeling like they’re ready to conquer the world, or at least tune a few queries.

Q: What excites you most about finding and fixing poorly performing queries?
A:
Well, the business answer is that I’m improving the efficiency and reliability of our systems to better supply our customers with access to the information they need to make good decisions. But the nerd answer is that I really enjoy figuring out what’s going wrong and finding ways to improve things.

Q: What's the most surprising statement attendees might hear you say during the pre-con?
A:
I’m going to tell them to not use some of the functionality within SQL Server. Flat out. It’s too dangerous and there are few, if any, requirements for this piece of functionality that are not satisfied elsewhere with zero danger.

Q: What’s the biggest myth around query tuning that you’d like to debunk?
A:
That throwing an index at the query fixes it. The problems most of the time are right there in the code. Yes, indexes are great ways to tune query performance, but adjusting the query itself is frequently the better way.

Q: What still trips you up in mastering SQL Server’s query optimizer?
A:
Figuring out why I’m seeing something unexpected. When you get behavior you didn’t anticipate, there’s seldom a quick and simple solution. I have to dig through the properties in the operators, same as everyone else.

Q: If attendees could start putting into practice just one thing after this pre-con, what would you want that to be?
A:
Maintain your statistics better. I don’t think people realize just how vital they can be to ensuring that your queries run well.

PASS Summit 2014 Pre-Con Preview: Robert Cain, Bradley Ball & Jason Strate

Sept. 15, 2014 – Go inside PASS Summit 2014's full-day pre-conference sessions in this Q&A series with our presenters. We caught up with Robert Cain, Bradley Ball, and Jason Strate to learn more about their pre-con, Zero to Hero with PowerShell and SQL Server.

Q: If your pre-con had a theme song, what would it be and why?
Robert:
 "Can't Stop Rockin'" by ZZ Top, because once you start rocking with PowerShell, you can't stop.
Bradley: "Timber" by Pitbull and Ke$ha. There’s a lot of tasks in the DBA/BI world that PowerShell makes easy. The bigger they are, the harder they fall.
Jason: "Come Sail Away" by Styx, because as I've told others, the boat for learning PowerShell has sailed, and it's time to get everyone up to speed on it.

Q: Robert, what excites you most about using PowerShell with SQL Server?
A: The incredible diversity of tasks you can automate using PowerShell. Everything from DBA tasks to BI to development can be automated using PowerShell with SQL Server.

Q: Bradley, what's the most surprising statement attendees might hear you say during the pre-con?
A:
Sometimes PowerShell’s a better ETL tool than SSIS.

Q: Jason, what’s the biggest myth around learning PowerShell that you’d like to debunk?
A:
PowerShell isn't for everything. It's a tool for the chest, but it isn't a magical hammer that can take care of everything. Knowing its capabilities will help you use PowerShell where it fits, while providing an understanding of when using it is like cleaning a window with a sledgehammer.

Q: If attendees could start putting into practice just one thing after your pre-con, what would you want that to be?
Robert:
Using PowerShell to explore their SQL Servers to get quick answers to common questions.
Bradley: Making their lives easier by using PowerShell to automate time-consuming tasks.
Jason: It bears repeating: PowerShell is sometimes a better tool for ETL than SSIS.

PASS Summit 2014 Pre-Con Preview: Adam Machanic

Sept. 15, 2014 – Go inside PASS Summit 2014's full-day pre-conference sessions in this Q&A series with our presenters. In this interview, Adam Machanic takes us inside his pre-con, Better Performance Through Parallelism.

Q: If your pre-con had a theme song, what would it be and why?
A: "The Power" by Snap! This pre-con teaches people to take control of performance for large queries and to use techniques that put them in the driver's seat. The query optimizer does not – and cannot – make the right choice every time. If you want ultimate performance, you must take matters into your own hands.

Q: What excites you most about SQL Server’s parallel processing?
A: It's a feature set that is at once both very mature and very much in a growth phase. Parallelism works well, but it doesn't always kick in when it should or work in an optimal fashion. And not many people know how to get it to play nice. As a developer, having a deep understanding of parallelism gives you a huge edge over the competition.

Q: What's the most surprising statement attendees might hear you say during the pre-con?
A:
Columnstore, despite what you may have heard, is not the answer to most of your tough performance challenges. (Even though it might help, sometimes.)

Q: What’s the biggest myth around parallelism and query optimization that you’d like to debunk?
A:
Many people are still confused about what, exactly, this CXPACKET thing *really* means, and what to do about it. At the end of this seminar you will be able to describe CXPACKET very accurately and you will understand its exact implications.

Q: What still trips you up in mastering SQL Server’s parallelism settings?
A:
Sometimes mixed workload scenarios present some interesting challenges. For some of the settings, there is only a single instance-wide configuration knob. That can be tough. But as with everything, there are options.

Q: If attendees could start putting into practice just one thing after this pre-con, what would you want that to be?
A:
Some of my prior seminar attendees have written to tell me that my Parallel APPLY query patten has yielded performance gains of 10 times or greater. It often takes only a few minutes to bolt it on to an existing query, and properly applied, it does truly amazing things. This is why I teach the seminar; I want people to go back to the office and fix their tough performance issues so that they can spend their time building cool new apps instead of messing with the database all day. 

PASS Summit 2014 Pre-Con Preview: Itzik Ben-Gan

Sept. 15, 2014 – Go inside PASS Summit 2014's full-day pre-conference sessions in this Q&A series with our presenters. First up: Itzik Ben-Gan and Mastering T-SQL Querying Fundamentals.

Q: If your pre-con had a theme song, what would it be and why?
A: The Beatles’ “Here Comes the Sun.” The seminar will shed light on what correct T-SQL thinking is.

Q: T-SQL was named the most popular programming language in 2013 - what excites you most about it?
A: T-SQL is my native tongue; it’s kind of my language. It’s great to know that many others like what you like. It’s also evidence of the usefulness and practicality of the language.
 
Q: What's the most surprising statement attendees might hear you say about query fundamentals during the pre-con?
A: “Now you know everything there is to know about T-SQL fundamentals.” If I did say it, of course, it would be just a joke. The point is that people often get the wrong impression that the language is simple to master. But the more you learn, the more you realize how deep and non-trivial it is.
 
Q: What’s the biggest T-SQL querying myth that you’d like to debunk?
A: Probably the most common myth has to do with confusing the physical and logical layers, ignoring or being oblivious to the relational model’s physical data independence principal and thinking that the data is organized in certain physical order and that this provides guarantees that the rows will be processed and/or returned in that order. People keep falling into this trap over and over again, including very smart people. Classic examples are queries in table expressions that have TOP and ORDER BY, what people refer to as quirky update, and others.

Q: What still trips you up in mastering logical query processing?
A: The fact that there are so many things that seem unnatural about the language until your learn about logical query processing. When you learn about it, there are so many a-ha moments, and things suddenly start making so much more sense.

Q: If attendees could start putting into practice just one thing after this pre-con, what would you want that to be?
A: I would say mainly that they would start using the language in the correct way, having the right expectations from it, and also knowing what not to expect from it. This is the "big picture" part.

As for an example of something more specific that attendees will be able to use immediately, they will be able to elegantly solve the problem of not being able to refer to column aliases defined in the SELECT clause in the WHERE, GROUP BY, and other expressions in the same SELECT clause. They will be able to do this using a trick that I will show them based on the APPLY operator and the VALUES clause.

Microsoft Jim Gray Systems Lab’s Rimma Nehme Keynoting at PASS Summit 2014

Plus, Black Girls Code founder Kimberly Bryant taking center stage at Women in Technology luncheon


          

Sept. 2, 2014 — Polybase and SQL Server query optimization guru Dr. Rimma Nehme, senior research engineer at the Microsoft Jim Gray Systems Lab, will kick off Day 2 at PASS Summit 2014 in Seattle, WA, Nov. 6, with Black Girls CODE founder Kimberly Bryant headlining the conference’s popular Women in Technology (WIT) luncheon.

Rimma, who has helped prepare Dr. David DeWitt’s celebrated PASS Summit keynotes since 2010, is known for her work on PolyBase, which integrates SQL Server Parallel Data Warehouse (PDW) with Hadoop, as well as the SQL Server PDW query optimizer, a partial results framework for database systems, an automated partitioning advisor for parallel database systems, and more. With her keynote, “Cloud Databases 101,” Rimma will be taking Summit’s 5,000+ SQL Server and BI professionals deep into the what, why and how of data processing in the cloud.

“It’s an honor to help carry on PASS Summit’s rich tradition of helping SQL Server and BI professionals get the most out of their database environments, and I’m thrilled to be sharing some of the exciting work done in the field around working with data in the cloud.” Rimma says. “When talking about cloud databases, people often mean different things. Some may be referring to a pay-per-use service; others may be speaking about a specific piece of software. In this keynote, we will look under the covers of cloud databases and try to dispel some of the myths.”

WIT luncheon speaker Kimberly Bryant, an electrical engineer working in biotech, was inspired by her daughter in 2011 to launch the non-profit Black Girls CODE (BGC), with the mission of supporting and promoting the underrepresented female and African demographic (25% and 3%, respectively, in 2012) within the technology industry. BGC has grown to 3,000 students across 7 US states as well as in Johannesburg, South Africa, and has received support from many companies both within and outside of the technology industry. Kimberly will be taking questions from the onsite audience and from Twitter during the Nov. 6 live-stream event, hosted by PASS’s WIT Chapter and sponsored by SQL Sentry. 

“The motto of Black Girls CODE is ‘Imagine. Build. Create,’” Kimberly notes. “I can’t wait to share with the PASS WIT and data communities how we can all imagine a world where everyone is given the tools to succeed, and get even more data professionals involved in building ways for everyone to access information and create a new age of women and women of color in technology.”

PASS Summit, organized by and for the SQL Server community, is the largest SQL Server event in the world, delivering 200+ technical sessions, 18 full-day pre-conference sessions, and nonstop networking opportunities with the industry’s top SQL Server and BI experts.

For full details and to register at the discounted rate by Sept. 24, visit http://www.sqlpass.org/summit/2014

PASS Summit Session Selection

July 2, 2014 – It’s been exciting to see all the blog posts and tweets from speakers selected for PASS Summit 2014 – especially those who will be presenting at Summit for the first time. It’s also a bittersweet time as we commiserate with those who weren’t selected for this year’s program.

The hardest part of the Program Committee’s monumental task of reviewing, rating, and selecting sessions and speakers is not being able to include all the quality sessions and speakers we want to. This year’s 88-member team of community volunteers worked extremely hard and had to make some difficult choices. As the Program Committee reviews this year’s processes as well as feedback from its members and the community on how to improve and deliver the best possible Summit program, we wanted to share some ideas around the main discussions regarding the 2014 session selection process.

A Great Place to Start Is with Data
As both the SQL Server and Business Intelligence space and the attendance at PASS Summit continue to grow, our program also continues to grow to cover key topics and meet the needs of our community. For PASS Summit 2014, we increased the number of community sessions to 135 (not counting Lightning Talks), nine more than last year, and the number of community pre-conference sessions from 12 to 16. For the 135 session slots, we received a record 943 abstracts from 335 speakers, meaning that from the outset, we would be able to select only about 15% of submissions. (For an overview of the session selection process, please see PASS Summit: Already Setting Records.)

We want PASS Summit to be a showcase of the best and brightest technical experts and compelling speakers – from seasoned experts to rising stars. That means creating a mix of returning and first-time Summit speakers; this year, 26% of our speakers will be new to Summit. Because we continue to see an increase in the number of great session proposals from quality speakers, we will continue to look at ways to increase the number of community speaking slots.

To Publish or Not Publish Ratings
Members of the speaker and abstract review teams separately rate each speaker or session they’re assigned. The Program Managers and myself then use those speaker scores and abstract ratings, as well as topic balance, speaker balance, and skill level considerations, to build a cohesive program. Even a highly-rated session in a particular track might not be selected for the final program if that speaker already has the maximum two general sessions, for example, or to achieve a balanced program in terms of topics and skill levels.

So why not make the ratings public? First, the Program Team doesn’t want to embarrass or discourage anyone whose session received a low rating. Publishing the ratings would also open the door to questions and disagreements about why speakers or sessions received certain ratings – even among sessions that were selected. Although it’s unlikely we will publically share the session ratings, we are continuing to look for ways to improve feedback on why a session wasn’t accepted, some of which we instituted this year (see the next point).

Providing a Feedback Loop
As part of the session review and rating process, each session is typically reviewed by three or more team members. Reviewers are encouraged to provide written comments about the abstract along with a rating. The Program Managers then use the comments and ratings to build the best possible program. Unfortunately, not all the abstracts have comments, and the quality and quantity of the comments vary greatly. Our current tool, Orator, does not have the capability to combine all the comments from the various reviewers into comprehensive feedback for each session. We are looking at how to improve the use of comments in the abstract review process for next year and enhance Orator with better feedback capabilities.
 
If you submitted a session proposal for Summit 2014 and would like the comments from the abstract review team, please email program@sqlpass.org and we will send you the comments that are available for your abstract. Please note that, as stated above, not all abstracts have comments, and the comments are related to the abstract only and not why the session was or wasn’t accepted.

Based on feedback from the community over the past year, we also worked to improve the wording we use in our speaker notification letters for sessions that weren’t selected, as follows, but we currently do not have more specific comments about why a session wasn’t accepted.

Previous Reason  Updated This Year To 
3rd party or vendor specific topic Session deemed too focused on a vendor product
High number of sessions already selected for topic
Popular topic, higher rated session selected
Limited target audience
Less popular topic than others submitted 
Max sessions allocated for track
Allocated number for track filled based on session rating and topic coverage
Speaker has exceeded number of selected sessions    
Speaker has exceeded number of selected sessions - 2 General Sessions max 

We are forming a Program Committee Special Project Team to review and improve the feedback process for future events and are committed to having the changes in place for the PASS Summit 2015 session selection process.

Pre-cons by Board Members
Members of the PASS Board of Directors are also part of the SQL Server and PASS communities and are allowed to submit session abstracts and speak at PASS events, including presenting pre-conference sessions. All sessions proposals – including pre-con proposals submitted by members of the Board – go through the same blind abstract review, in which the abstract reviewers don’t know who submitted the abstract.

In most cases, pre-conference speakers are offered financial compensation for their pre-con sessions. Section VI.14. of the PASS Bylaws state:
“Directors shall not receive any salaries for their services as Directors, but by resolution of the Board of Directors, a fixed sum and/or expenses of attendance, if any, may be allowed for attendance at each regular or special meeting of the Board; provided that nothing herein contained shall be construed to preclude any Director from serving PASS in an educational or speaking capacity and receiving compensation upon approval by a majority vote from the Board of Directors.

Simply put, any member of the Board is eligible to give a pre-con or other session at Summit. They are eligible for compensation if compensation is approved by a majority vote of the Board of Directors. The Board member selected to give a pre-con at Summit 2014 did not request to be compensated, therefore no vote was required. The Executive Committee did discuss the situation prior to announcing pre-con speakers and ensured that all decisions were in compliance with the bylaws and that the Board member would be able to fulfill all his duties during the week.

Changing Session Titles and Abstracts
All session titles and abstracts are reviewed and rated exactly as they are submitted. After the Program Committee has selected the final session list, all titles and abstracts are proofed for accuracy, clarity, grammar, and marketability, and we work with speakers on any requested updates.

Let’s Put It to a Vote?
There’s been some discussion about supplementing the session review/selection process or avoiding it entirely by putting some or all sessions up for community vote. Although it’s an attractive idea, whenever we’ve invited the community to vote on sessions – as with past Lightning Talks or Community Choice sessions – we’ve received extremely low participation, which leads to skewed results. Well-known speakers also have a distinct advantage in a voting scenario, and even in a “blind voting” situation without speaker names, it would be difficult to achieve a balance of topics, speakers, and session levels.

PASS Summit is first and foremost a community conference – built by dedicated community volunteers around open submissions from passionate community members – and we are always open and looking at ways to improve that process. We appreciate your feedback around the session selection process and helping develop new speakers, and we are working to schedule Program Committee office hours at Summit to hear your ideas, as well as talks on such topics as how to write an effective abstract and a good speaker profile – stay tuned for details. In addition, watch for sessions throughout the year on creating successful abstracts, how the Program Committee works, and how sessions are selected.

The Program Team’s work is never done – as soon as sessions are selected, we’re working on PowerPoint reviews, supporting speakers during the event, reviewing attendees’ feedback, and brainstorming ideas for making the next Summit even better. Please keep your feedback coming all year long; email us at program@sqlpass.org.
– Amy Lewis
Director of PASS Programs


 

PASS Summit: Already Setting Records

June 24, 2014  Congratulations to all the community speakers selected for PASS Summit 2014, and thanks to everyone who submitted abstracts in a record-breaking year! We had the most Summit submissions ever, with 943 abstracts submitted for the 144 community session slots in this year's program.

On behalf of the Program Team, I want to share how much we appreciate the SQL Server community’s ever-growing support in helping build the biggest and best educational program for SQL Server and BI professionals.

Thank You, Program Committee Volunteers
I would like to thank all of this year’s 88 Summit Program Committee volunteers for their dedication and hard work in the session review, scoring, rating, and selection process. The team reviewed all the 943 abstracts submitted by 335 speakers from around the world.

I also want to give a special thank you to this year's Program Managers, Lance Harra and Melissa Coates, who led the Program Committee through all phases of the selection process and spent countless hours analyzing and constructing a well-balanced conference program. Finally, a huge thanks to Marcella McKeown and Emilija Dufresne at PASS HQ – invaluable members of the Program Team who support and help coordinate and execute all program-related functions.

Behind the Scenes: How Are Sessions Selected?
The program-selection process is constantly being fine-tuned and improved based on lessons learned and feedback from each event. We welcome and encourage feedback and look forward to continuing to enhance our processes for a fair and objective approach that ensures a well-balanced program. Here’s a high-level overview of how Summit sessions are selected:

    • Reviewing Abstracts, Speakers, PPTs: Program Committee volunteers are assigned to one of three teams:
      • Abstract Review – Abstract Review volunteers work in sub-teams that match the program’s educational tracks, with each team reviewing and ranking abstracts in its track. The abstract review teams do not know which speakers submitted which abstracts; this "blind rating" is done to remove any favoritism in the scoring process, creating an even playing field for both new and seasoned speakers.
      • Speaker Review – This team separately reviews speaker credentials, experience, and past attendee feedback to help select a slate of quality presenters.
      • PowerPoint Review – After sessions are selected for Summit, the PowerPoint Review teams take over, reviewing speakers’ presentations, including verifying completeness, ensuring that required slides are included, and doing final spelling/grammar checks.
    • Building the Program: When the Abstract and Speaker Review teams are finished, the program managers collect all the scores and ratings and analyze the top sessions from each track to fill the community session slots. Key factors in this analysis phase include:
      • Topic Balance – The goals are to ensure that sessions within each track are inclusive and representative of the track’s key topics and to avoid duplication.
      • Level Balance – We want to ensure a good mix of skill levels for beginners through experts.
      • Speaker Balance – We strive for a lineup that includes both established expert speakers and rising stars. To offer a good variety of speakers, we limit the number of general sessions to two per presenter.
    • Partnering with Microsoft: With the community sessions selected, our next step now is to open the Microsoft call for speakers, collaborating with Microsoft to make sure selected submissions complement the community sessions and create a cohesive overall Summit program. Watch for Microsoft sessions and the complete session schedule in early September.


New: Improved Filtering and Learning Paths

As part of our commitment to execute a robust and diverse educational program for Summit 2014, we are providing better attendee guidance through role- and skill-based learning tracks. This year, we are introducing Learning Paths, which are being rolled out as part of an improved session filtering and search feature.

Filter options include Track, Speaker, Level, Session Type, and the new Learning Paths, which let attendees further refine their search by leveraging nine cross-track topics:

    • Beginner
    • Big Data
    • Cloud
    • Hardware/Virtualization
    • High Availability/ Disaster Recover
    • Performance
    • Power BI
    • Security
    • SQL Server 2014

If an attendee is interested in sessions related to SQL Server running in a virtualized environment, for example, he/she can select the Hardware/Virtualization Learning Path. Additional Learning Path filters can be applied for an even more refined search.

Recognizing that Cloud/Azure-related topics cross various tracks and interests, this year we have incorporated Cloud sessions into the appropriate remaining tracks and have created new filtering and search options on the PASS Summit 2014 Sessions page. We hope the new filtering and search options will make it easier for all Summit attendees to locate sessions that are best suited to their interests and needs.

We have a phenomenal program this year, planned and presented by the SQL Server Community for the SQL Server Community. Help us spread the word, and don’t forget to register by June 27 to save $300 on your registration. See you in Seattle!
– Amy Lewis
PASS Director of Programs


 


Best of PASS Summit 2013

February 3, 2014  As the Program Committee prepares to open the PASS Summit 2014 call for speakers later this month, we’re excited to recognize the Top 10 sessions from PASS Summit 2013:


The Top 10 list is based on average attendee evaluations from sessions that had a minimum of 50 attendees and evaluations from at least 20 or 20% of those attendees (whichever is greater).

Recordings of these “best of” sessions are now available to all PASS members – just log in here to start watching. You can also view other selected PASS Summit 2013 sessions free on PASStv and own the entire set of PASS Summit 2013 session recordings.

And don’t forget to register by March 7 to save on this year’s event, Nov. 4-7, in Seattle.

Chapter Referral Program Update

December 10, 2013 – Congratulations to all PASS local Chapters that helped refer their members to PASS Summit 2013. Sixty-nine Chapters participated in the program and earned anywhere from $50 to $1000 for their respective Chapters. Gift cards will be sent to each participating Chapter leader early next week. Find out how much your Chapter earned:

Chapter Amount Chapter Leader
Atlanta Business Intelligence Group $450 Teo Lachev
Atlanta SQL Server User Group; Atlanta Microsoft Database Forum $500 Donald Wert
Belgian SQL Server User Group $50 Frederik Vandeputte
Calgary PASS $150 Noel Tan
Canada - British Columbia (Vancouver) $100 Richard Baumet
CBusPASS $100 Dave Schutz
Central New Jersey SSUG $100 Linda Zhang
Central PA SSUG $100 Dustin Jones
Charleston SQL Server User Group $50 Ryan McKnight
Charlotte BI Group $350 Jason Thomas
Charlotte SQL Server User Group $200 Peter Shire
Chicago SQL BI User Group $150 Marcello Benati
Chicago SQL Server User Group $500 Aaron Lowe
Cincinnati PASS $50 Anthony Mattas
Denver SQL Server User Group $250 Steve Wake
Eugene Area SQL Server User Group $50 Dan Guzman
FoxPASS $150 Jes Borland
French SQL Server User Group/Groupe des Utilisateurs
  Francophone de Microsoft  SQL Server (France) $150 Arian Papillon
Hampton Roads SharePoint and SQL Users Group                               $50          Susan Lennon
Houston Area SQL Server User Group $1,000 Nancy Hidy Wilson
IndyPASS                                                                                                $650 Ray Lucas
Inland Empire SQL Server User Group $50 Shannon Shields
Iowa SQL Server User Group $250 Juan M. Moya
Israeli SQL Server User Group $150 Guy Glantser
Jacksonville SQL Server Users Group $150 Devin Knight
Kansas City SQL Server User Group $300 Andrew Cross
KnoxSQL - SQL Server User Group                                                       $250        Arlene Gray
Louisville SQL Server User Group $50 Dave Fackler
Malibu SQL Server User Group $150 Steve Rezhener
Microsoft Business Intelligence Community (MSBIC) $50 Greg Taylor
Microsoft Business Intelligence User Group of South Florida $200 Luis Figueroa
Midlands PASS $50 Kenneth Brian Kelley
Minnesota Microsoft BI User Group                                                        $450 Dan English
Minnesota SQL Server User Group $750 Paul Timmerman
Nashville SQL Server User Group $100 Tamera Clark
Netherlands Antilles (Curacao) $50 Roy Ernest
New England SQL Server Users Group $100 Adam Machanic
New Jersey SQL Server User Group $100 John Dempsey
North Texas SQL Servers Users Group $650 Sri Sridharan
Northern Virginia SQL Server Users Group $250 Jim Rotan
Oklahoma City SQL Server Developers Group $350 Kristin Ferrier
Olympia Area SQL Server User Group $100 Greg Larsen
Omaha SQL/BI User Group $200 John Morehouse
Oregon SQL $50 Arnie Rowland
PASS DC $50 Chris Bell
Philadelphia SQL Server User Group $800 Vince Napoli
Pittsburgh SQL Server Users Group $50 Gina Walters
Portland SQL Server User Group $200 Ken Starnes
Quad Cities PASS Chapter $350 Sheila Acker
Rochester PASS $100 Matt Slocum
Russian SQL Server User Group $50 
Sacramento SQL Server User Group $150 Mitch Bottel
Salt Lake City SQL Server User Group $100 Pat Wright
San Antonio SQL Server User Group $100 Jim Steiner
Southwest Missouri SQL Server Users Group                                        $100 Anthony Young
SQL PASS Edmonton $100 Harry Zheng
SQLPASS in Detroit                                                                                $150 Joseph Fleming
St. Louis SQL Sever User Group $100 Julie Bloomquist
Steel City SQL User Group $50 John Baldwin
Tampa Bay SQL User Group $50 Jose Chinchilla
Toronto SQL Sever User Group $100 Karen Lopez
Triad SQL Business Intelligence User Group $300 Katherine Fraser
Triad SQL Server User Group $50 Kevin Goode
Triangle Area SQL Server Users Group $50 Brett Tomson
Victoria SQL Server User Group $1,000 Jonathan Mears
Wellington SQL Server User Group                                                        $50 David Curlewis
West Michigan SQL Server User Group $200 Josh Fennessy
Wichita SQL Server User Group $50 Patrick Purviance
Winnipeg SQL Server User Group $50 Michael Defehr



PASS Board Q&A Recap

October 29, 2013 – The annual PASS Board of Directors Q&A session at PASS Summit 2013 covered the recent PASS Board elections, hosting PASS Summit outside of Seattle, and the PASS organization privacy policy, among other topics.

All current PASS Board members were on stage to help answer questions from the community. Here’s a quick recap of the top three questions and answers:

Q: There are concerns in the community that duplicate votes occurred in the recent PASS Board elections. How did PASS review the votes, and how did this affect the election results?
A:
The election results remain unchanged even when taking duplicates into account. Eligible voters were determined by unique email address and date entered into the system. All submitted ballots were compared to registration lists for paid PASS events. Duplicate ballots were discovered based on first name, last name, and address. Ballots were also compared to our membership data (people who fill in the member profile on sqlpass.org), and additional duplicates were uncovered based on identical first and last name and identical voting pattern.

Q: What are PASS’s plans to host another Summit event outside of the Seattle area?
A:
This Summit in Charlotte, NC, is the first time we’ve been out of Seattle since 2007! It has been a great success, but we are going to spend some time analyzing the pros and cons of hosting outside of Seattle before we decide to move to different locations. Booking facilities for events of this size happens years in advance, and we are booked in the Seattle area for the next 3 years.

Q: There was some confusion among PASS Chapter leaders about how to reach out to local SQLSaturday event registrants.
A:
Any Chapter Leader involved in organizing a SQLSaturday event may use the SQLSaturday sponsor opt-in list to append registrant contact information to their Chapter email list.